Nusa Penida: Exploring the East Coast

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We had to leave Nusa penida earlier than exepected today so unfotunately had to cut our trip short. This meant we didn't get the opportunity to climb down to Diamond Beach or see some of the other areas the east coast is famous for.

However, what we did see made up for it and Diamon beach, especially, exceeded expectations.

Goa Giri Putri Cave

A ceremony happening inside the cave

Starting the day off with something different, we visited a temple located in a massive underground cave.

Our driver stopped in a car park just outside and directed us to where we could rent a sarong. We paid 5k each.

After climbing up some steps you’ll be blessed and then be required to sign your name in a visitors book. You’ll then get directed to a tiny hole in the ground that leads to the cave.

It’s incredibly atmospheric inside, all you could hear were the echoes of chanting and praying. You can walk all the way through to the exit and then follow the road to the right which will take you back to the main road where you can find the car park.

Diamond Beach

The swing down below on Diamond Beach

The coastline of Nusa Penida thus far has not failed to disappoint! We let out an audible ‘holy shit’ upon seeing seeing the full view of Diamond Beach.

The white cliffs juxtaposed against the turquoise waters and palm trees looked unbelievably beautiful. We couldn’t stop taking photos.

There are few areas to check out for different views and there is, of course, the beach down below.

Famous views of Diamond Beach

We unfortunately arrived here during a very busy time and didn’t get the chance to make our way down the staircase to the beach as we were on a tight time frame so we opted to take the walk down to Atuh Beach instead as we heard it was a better place to swim.

Atuh Beach

Views of Atuh Beach and rock formations in the bay

There is another steep staircase near the entrance for Diamond Beach which takes you to Atuh Beach. The surface down is difficult but a rope is attached to the cliff side which makes it easier (and feel much safer).

Lena walking into the water

Atuh Beach is a great place to stop and chill as there are restaurants and beach chairs all along the beach.

Once again, a stunning rock formation sits out in the bay just waiting to be photographed. Coming here for sunrise would be a treat.

Thousand Island & Treehouse Viewpoint

The monument marking the viewpoint

Our last stop for the day we’re the Thousand Island & Treehouse Viewpoints.

The shots of the treehouse are quite famous on Instagram, and you can get your own shot for just 50k if you’re so inclined.

Diamond Beach in the distance and ongoing construction

To reach this area requires another steep walk down some stairs which we had become pros at during our time on this island.

The main viewpoint offers sweeping views of Diamond Beach and more. There is not much else to do here other than take photos of the surroundings.

Last thoughts

Whilst we didn’t get the chance to visit everywhere the east coast offers, we received a nice sampling.

Some other spots are Teletubbies Hill and Suwehan Beach which we would have loved to visit if we had time.

The views of Diamond Beach alone, however, make this trip more than worthwhile and it’s beauty & perfection is something that will stay etched in our minds for a long time to come.

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Nusa Penida: Exploring the West Coast

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We started our day bright and early at 7:30am. We had a few places we wanted to visit and our plan was quite ambitious.

We met our driver, Simanta, and headed to our first stop, the now very famous Kelingking Beach.

Kelingking Beach

Kelingking Beach and alternate views

We arrived at around 8:35am and were pleased to see it wasn’t too crowded yet. The beautiful formation, which resembles a T-Rex, set against the turquoise waters was wondrous. Seeing this place in so many photos beforehand didn’t do it justice.

The T-Rex shape coming through

We opted not to make our way all the way down the ultra steep footpath to the beach below and stopped halfway, preserving our energy for what else the day had in store for us.

Hot tip: We explored the area to the right of the main pathway where we had a different view of the iconic formation all to ourselves.

Angels Billabong & Broken Beach

Angel's Billabong and the central archway at Broken Beach

Angels Billabong is a naturally formed infinity pool overlooking the ocean. We were warned against going in for a swim but it was safe to dip your feet in.

Broken Beach, just a short walk away, boasts an incredibly distinctive coastal line. As it’s name suggests, it feels as if the coast started breaking apart to reveal a beautiful beach below.

The stunning turqoise colours of the water

An archway stretches over the middle allowing you to admire the view from many angles, opening up a lot of photo opportunities.

As with Kelingking Beach, be warned that this area gets very busy in the morning as it’s on most tour companies itineraries.

Tembeling Forest & Beach

Piled rocks through the cave

An area more off-the-beaten-path, Tembeling Forest hides a natural pool and secluded beach at the end of an incredibly steep and rocky trail. From the entrance point, you have a few options on how to reach the bottom:

  • • You can walk 30 minutes down the trail
  • • You can pay between 50 - 75k for a return taxi motorbike ride
  • • You can brave the road yourself and drive down on your rented motorbike
A quiet beach and water fountains

We opted for the return taxi ride. Riding down yourself requires a high level of skill, so only do so if you are extremely comfortable riding a motorbike.

The natural pool itself is the first part you’ll walk past and the area around it serves as a place of worship for locals. There were locals cliff jumping into the pool.

Pressing forward will take you past a second pool which is much smaller in scale.

Peguyangan Waterfall

The waterfall at the bottom

Our next stop was possibly the highlight of our west coast tour. A 300ish step walk down a rickety set of stairs anchored to the cliff side takes you to a small waterfall, worship area and stunning views of the coastline.

You will be required to rent a sarong before beginning the trail, which cost 15k each.

A local family walkingdown the iconic blue steps and the ocean below

We had to muster up all of our courage to face the heights and stay focused on the walk down. The walk down feels worse than going back up. You will feel a great sense of accomplishment when you reach the bottom.

Locals gathered at a small temple at the bottom of the stairs

We were walking behind a group of Balinese people who were making their way down to make offerings and prayers. I wonder how often they make this trip down?

Crystal Bay

Sunset at Crystal Bay

Our last stop was the somewhat underwhelming Crystal Bay. Whilst not that spectacular (by Nusa Penida standards) it served its purpose as a place to unwind with a couple of Bintangs and watch the sunset.

There is a small island in the bay that appeared to have a small temple on top, giving off some similar vibes to Tanah Lot in Bali.

Locals and tourists enjoying Crystal Bay

Last thoughts

No visit to Nusa Penida would be complete without visiting sone of the spots on this list.

Whilst Kelingking Beach is essential, if you’re short on time you could easily drop Crystal Bay and even Angels Billabong & Broken Beach (Especially if you are planning on visiting the east coast as well).

Tembeling Forest and Peguyangan Waterfall were much quieter and were more enjoyable as a result.

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